Brexit Q&A

How will the High Court ruling impact on Brexit?

On 3 November 2016, the High Court ruled that the Prime Minister could not trigger Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty (the process which sets in motion the UK’s withdrawal from the European Union over a two-year period) without recourse to Parliament.. The government has appealed to the Supreme Court to seek to overturn the decision. At time of writing, a verdict is expected on 7 December 2016 although this could be delayed. Despite the landmark constitutional ruling, the Prime Minister says she remains determined to invoke Article 50 in March 2017.

Brexit: High Court ruling on Article 50 explained

Reality check: Could High Court ruling on Article 50 scupper Brexit?

  • www.bbc.co.uk/news/ukpolitics BBC reality check article arguing that the process of obtaining Parliamentary approval to move Article 50 may delay or complicate the process but it is unlikely that Parliament could ignore the outcome of the referendum.

What does the High Court’s Article 50 ruling mean for Brexit?

  • fullfact.org/europe/ concludes how the government cannot leave the EU without Parliament passing a law, not that the judges have blocked Brexit.

Taking back control

  • www.economist.com/news/ Economist article suggesting that the High Court ruling will make a ‘soft’ Brexit more likely.

Brexit: Theresa May creates ‘bombproof’ Article 50 bill to prevent MPs from holding it up

Government already drafting Brexit Article 50 bill

  • news.sky.com/story The government is already preparing the first draft of a bill to move Article 50 so the Prime Minister can hit her 31 March deadline for officially triggering Brexit.

Was Theresa May’s visit to India a precursor to a post-Brexit free trade agreement?

  • To what extent was Theresa May’s recent visit to India, a country with 7.1 per cent year-onyear growth in gross domestic product in the second quarter of 2016, as well as shared historic and linguistic ties, a precursor to new free trade agreements for the UK outside the EU?

British PM Theresa May heads to India with eye on postBrexit ties

Theresa May’s visit: Britain looks to further bilateral trade, India keen on liberal visa policy

  • www.firstpost.com/world An important matter for both countries will be to look at the implications of a post-Brexit UK on bilateral relations.

Britain PM Theresa May’s India visit was underwhelming, say critics

Theresa May’s visit has moved India-UK relations forward: Indian envoy

  • www.india.com/news/world/ Theresa May’s first visit to India as Prime Minister has sent a clear signal to the world about the close ties shared by the two countries, according to the acting high commissioner of India to the UK.

Theresa May’s empty-handed return from India; critics say visit was ‘pointless’

What is the impact of the US Presidential Election result on Brexit?

  • The US Presidential Election 2016 result meant that pro-Brexit Donald Trump will be the next occupant of the White House. Trump has described his victory as “Brexit plus plus plus” but what impact do commentators think it will have on US-UK relations?

What Donald Trump’s victory means for post-Brexit Britain?

  • www.independent.co.uk/voices/ While the impact of Donald Trump’s victory on a post-Brexit UK is hard to determine, Trump’s advisers have let it be known that Britain would not be last in line for a trade deal with the United States.

Brexit Briefing: what Trump’s victory means for Britain

  • www.ft.com/content/ The results of the US Presidential Election should prompt some serious thought about the UK’s place in the world.

Donald Trump’s win will make Brexit more painful

  • www.economist.com/blogs/ argues that the risks of a Trump presidency—protectionism, geopolitical turmoil, American isolationism—will be counter to British interests.

So what does Donald Trump mean for Brexit?

  • news.sky.com/story/ The UK was warned Brexit would leave it at the back of the queue for US trade deals but Trump’s victory means we might have jumped to the front.

Readers are invited to submit their own questions to Alexa Michael, LCCI’s business information executive: amichael@londonchamber.co.uk

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